Atlantan Magazine- Featuring Taste of Speed

Taste of speed the atlantanModern Luxury The Atlantan Sept 2014 magazine featuring Taste of Speed Event

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August 29, 2014 Posted Under: The C. B.A. Foundation   Read More

Another Success: Remembering Zachery 2014

Remembering Zachery a huge success. Thank you to all that donated. The Origami Owl Party was such a hit. Remembering Zachary2

Remembering Zachery 2013

remembering Zachery 2014

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August 10, 2014 Posted Under: The C. B.A. Foundation   Read More

Remembering Zachery Set for July 2, 2014

Remembering Zachery Sets a delivery date for the hospital. This has been a year of change when it has come to delivering things to the hospital. There has been several things… 1. we are dealing with a new contact for the hospital 2. Infection control has been tightened 3. We also have been contacted by several that will have to ship items or are doing fund raisers for Remembering Zachary and will not be done till the end of June. So in typing this I am trying to firming up a date…. we are going to try to go July 2, 2014. This is Zachary’s Birthday and what better way to celebrate his life than to go and to share the joy that we have been collecting. I am currently waiting to see if it is agreeable with the hospital. Because of this delay/extension I wanted to open it up that if you wanted to donate items, send money, whatever it was, then PLEASE take this as your second chance this year. We are still in need of: -Infant toys -stickers -games -Barbies -Hotwheels -card games -art supplies -Legos -Journals We also are in need of: -individually wrapped snacks -Granola Bars -Chips -muffins -nuts -gummies/fruit snacks -little candies -little snack cakes -Drink mixes These are just some ideas, we are open to other ideas and donations~

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June 20, 2014 Posted Under: Remembering Zachery, The C. B.A. Foundation   Read More

Please LIKE the page I have Capabilities NOT Disabilities on Facebook

Please Like the I have Capabilities NOT Disabilities on Facebook. If you would like to share your story send an email to www.thecbafoundation.com

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August 19, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

I Have Capabilites NOT Disabilities

MY STORY:

Individuals with APD usually have normal structure and function of the ear. However, they cannot process the information they hear in the same way as others do. This leads to difficulties in recognizing and interpreting sounds, especially the sounds composing speech. What was a normal school day for me was not for others and I slowly started to think I was “different”. I wore headphones, while my teacher wore a microphone. My seat was always in the front of the classroom. Attending speech therapy was a part of my schedule. Some of my classes consisted of only 5 people. My test went in a box labeled Special ED, even though I was taking the same test as everyone else. After having my brain mapped, I was transferred to a school that had a self-contained program that could help me with school. Since I lived out of the school district, I had to take the short bus to school. I didn’t fit in and I was bullied for years. I had low self-esteem and it continued to get worse as I got older.

I replaced my recess with helping disabled children in their classrooms. This was something that teachers had never seen, but I insisted. My eyes were open to something many children did not comprehend at that age. I saw everyone as individuals each having different capabilities.

High school was not easy. I set goals, which were to graduate my senior year, making all A’s which would then make me eligible for the Hope Scholarship. The day I graduated, while achieving those goals, I proved to myself that I was no different than anyone else. I only have capabilities and not disabilities. While it was a journey in itself to get into a college on time with everyone else, I am so blessed to say I am now beginning my 4th semester at Kennesaw State University; with the Hope Scholarship. Without this 14-year experience, I do not believe I would be the hard working woman I am today. I have no boundaries and I know I can achieve anything that I conceive. I may have ridden the short bus, but I plan on riding the big bus to my dreams.

My plan is to partner with Learning Disabilities Association of America. While working with the chapters of LDA in Georgia I will be developing an educational seminar for students. This involves me going to classrooms to increase awareness about learning disabilities. I plan on teaching them what exactly a learning disability is, how to control it and how to maintain self-confidence. I will show a slide show of men and women who have been very successful in the business world with learning disabilities. This will help prevent bullying and low self-esteem. It will also let kids without learning disabilities know that everyone has potential. This seminar will not only inspire those with learning disabilities, but everyone. It will give children self-confidence in and out of the classroom. I believe if students can realize they can be successful, they will have a better understanding of what is ahead of them. Self-esteem is something children struggle with and I am hoping my seminar will make a difference in their lives. Today still struggle with APD daily We are not different, we just learn differently.

Stephanie Gargiulo

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August 19, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

Educational Series; What are the Signs of a Learning Disability?

What Are the Signs of a Learning Disability?

While there is no one sign that a person has a learning disability, there are certain clues. We’ve listed a few below. Most related to elementary school tasks, because learning disabilities ten to be identified in elementary school. This is because school focuses on the very things that may be difficult for the child–reading, writing, math, listening, speaking, reasoning. A child probably wont show all these signs, or even most of them. However, if a child shows a number of these problems, then parents and the teacher should consider the possibility of a learning disability.
may have trouble learning the alphabet, rhyming words, or connecting letters to their sounds;
may make many mistakes when reading aloud, and repeat and pause often;
may not understand what he or she reads;
may have real trouble with spelling;
may have very messy handwriting or hold a pencil awkwardly;
may struggle to express ideas in writing;
may learn language late and have a limited vocabulary;
may have trouble remembering the sounds that letters make or hearing slight differences between words;
may have trouble understanding jokes, comic strips, and sarcasm;
may have trouble following directions;
may mispronounce words or use a wrong word that sounds similar;
may have trouble organizing what he or she wants to say or not be able to think of the word he or she needs for writing or conversation;
may not follow the social rules of conversation, such as taking turns, and may stand too close to the listener;
may confuse math symbols and misread numbers;
may not be able to retell a story in order (what happened first, second, third); or
may not know where to begin a task or how to go on from there.

If a child has unexpected problems learning to read, write, listen, speak, or do math, then teachers and parents may want to investigate more. The same is true if the child is struggling to do any one of these skills. The child may need to be evaluated to see if he or she has a learning disability.-NICHCYWhen a child has a learning disability, he or she:
may have trouble learning the alphabet, rhyming words, or connecting letters to their sounds;
may make many mistakes when reading aloud, and repeat and pause often;
may not understand what he or she reads;
may have real trouble with spelling;
may have very messy handwriting or hold a pencil awkwardly;
may struggle to express ideas in writing;
may learn language late and have a limited vocabulary;
may have trouble remembering the sounds that letters make or hearing slight differences between words;
may have trouble understanding jokes, comic strips, and sarcasm;
may have trouble following directions;
may mispronounce words or use a wrong word that sounds similar;
may have trouble organizing what he or she wants to say or not be able to think of the word he or she needs for writing or conversation;
may not follow the social rules of conversation, such as taking turns, and may stand too close to the listener;
may confuse math symbols and misread numbers;
may not be able to retell a story in order (what happened first, second, third); or
may not know where to begin a task or how to go on from there.

If a child has unexpected problems learning to read, write, listen, speak, or do math, then teachers and parents may want to investigate more. The same is true if the child is struggling to do any one of these skills. The child may need to be evaluated to see if he or she has a learning disability.-NICHCY

xx

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August 13, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

Educational Series: What is a Learning Disability?

What is a Learning Disability?

Any of various conditions that interfere with an individual’s ability to learn and so result in impaired functioning in language, reasoning, or academic skills and that are thought to be caused by difficulties in processing and integrating information – Marriam Webster

How Common are Learning Disabilities?

Very common! As many as 1 out of every 5 people in the United States has a learning disability. Almost 1 million children (ages 6 through 21) have some form of a learning disability and receive special education in school. In fact, one-third of all children who receive special education have a learning disability (Twenty-Ninth Annual Report to Congress, U.S. Department of Education, 2010).- NICHCY

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August 13, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

My Story

MY STORY:

Individuals with APD usually have normal structure and function of the ear. However, they cannot process the information they hear in the same way as others do. This leads to difficulties in recognizing and interpreting sounds, especially the sounds composing speech. What was a normal school day for me was not for others and I slowly started to think I was “different”. I wore headphones, while my teacher wore a microphone. My seat was always in the front of the classroom. Attending speech therapy was a part of my schedule. Some of my classes consisted of only 5 people. My test went in a box labeled Special ED, even though I was taking the same test as everyone else. After having my brain mapped, I was transferred to a school that had a self-contained program that could help me with school. Since I lived out of the school district, I had to take the short bus to school. I didn’t fit in and I was bullied for years. I had low self-esteem and it continued to get worse as I got older.

I replaced my recess with helping disabled children in their classrooms. This was something that teachers had never seen, but I insisted. My eyes were open to something many children did not comprehend at that age. I saw everyone as individuals each having different capabilities.

High school was not easy. I set goals, which were to graduate my senior year, making all A’s which would then make me eligible for the Hope Scholarship. The day I graduated, while achieving those goals, I proved to myself that I was no different than anyone else. I only have capabilities and not disabilities. While it was a journey in itself to get into a college on time with everyone else, I am so blessed to say I am now beginning my 4th semester at Kennesaw State University; with the Hope Scholarship. Without this 14-year experience, I do not believe I would be the hard working woman I am today. I have no boundaries and I know I can achieve anything that I conceive. I may have ridden the short bus, but I plan on riding the big bus to my dreams.

My plan is to partner with Learning Disabilities Association of America. While working with the chapters of LDA in Georgia I will be developing an educational seminar for students. This involves me going to classrooms to increase awareness about learning disabilities. I plan on teaching them what exactly a learning disability is, how to control it and how to maintain self-confidence. I will show a slide show of men and women who have been very successful in the business world with learning disabilities. This will help prevent bullying and low self-esteem. It will also let kids without learning disabilities know that everyone has potential. This seminar will not only inspire those with learning disabilities, but everyone. It will give children self-confidence in and out of the classroom. I believe if students can realize they can be successful, they will have a better understanding of what is ahead of them. Self-esteem is something children struggle with and I am hoping my seminar will make a difference in their lives. Today still struggle with APD daily We are not different, we just learn differently.

Stephanie Gargiulo
xx

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August 12, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

I have Capabilities not Disability–by Stephanie Gargiulo

i haveThis page was developed for not only those who struggle with a disability, but those who are inspired by someone with a disability. Share your story!

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August 11, 2013 Posted Under: I have Capabilites NOT Disabilites   Read More

Remembering Zachary–A Huge Success!

remembering Zachry

Thank you to all that made donations to make this such a successful event!

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June 24, 2013 Posted Under: Remembering Zachery   Read More